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's be honest. we eavesdrop, too. everyone is listening to everyone else. he went on to add, "we don't have the same means as the united states which makes us jealous." america spends tens of billions of dollars on intelligence collection. it's hard to get data to make good comparisons but it is safe to assume that washington's intelligence budget dwarfs that of other countries just as it does with defense spending. it is particularly strange that this rift should develop between the united states and its closest allies in europe. it was predictable and in fact in a sense predicted. in 2002, the british diplomat robert cooper wrote an essay in which he argued that europe was a post-modern international system in which force was no longer a serious option. instead, economic interdependence and cooperation were the governing ideas of state craft. and certainly when one looks at the european union, it does describe its reality. the prospect of war between france and germany which had gone to war three times between 1870 and 1950 seems utterly impossible. but outside of europe, the world is not
analysis and extra and don't forget instagram and if you missed any part of today's show, sear go to itunes and search state of the union. >> this is "gps." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. we have great show for you today. we'll start with nsa spying and uproar it caused in europe especially. germany's former defense minister will explain what is going on there. and then the former nsa director will help us understand what america's spies are really doing around the world and michael bloomberg called the mayor of the world. with the election of his successor on hand, what lessons does bloomberg have to share with us? one of them, cities need rich people. he'll explain. and the latest weapon against bad guys. it's not a new fangled drone or bunker buster bomb. it's simply brittany. i'll explain. revelations about the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home?
child and such, they don't want to have necessarily everyone having a second child. >> what do we -- first of all, what are labor through reeducation gaps and what does it mean that they are closing? >> the labor through education camps have been around since the late 1950s. and what they basically turned into is an opportunity for local officials to detain and arrest people without children for up to four years. and it's been a mechanism by which not only petty thieves and others can be put away, but also political dissidence and people who complain, petitioners who complain too loudly and cause problems for local officials. so they've had at least, somewhere, maybe 310,000 people reportedly have been in these labor reeducation camps. i mean, sometimes they say as many as 2 million have been detained. >> so a step forward again, this is being worn down? >> it's indeed a step forward in the sense this is something reformers have been calling on for a long time. the question, though, is whether the government simply takes these people who had been sent to reeducation labor camps an
, especially in cities just know the cost of educating your child as such they don't want to necessarily have a second child. >> china may still face that demographic challenge. what are labor through reeducation camps and what does it mean that they're closing? >> they have been around since the late 1950s. and what they basically turned into is an opportunity for local officials to detain, arrest people without trial for up to four years. and it's been a mechanism by which petty thieves and others can be put away but also political dissidents and people who complain, petitioners where people reportedly have been in labor through reeducation camps. sometimes as many as 2 million have been detained. >> a step forward again? >> indeed a step forward in reformers have called for this for a long time. the question is whether the government who takes the people sent to reeducation through labor camps and sends them to prisons and jails instead and we don't know the answer to that yet. >> the big news supposed to come out of this conference was being signaled was comprehensive economic reform, leg
their military nuclear infrastructure? this deal does not do that. they don't have to dismantle a single centrifuge. they don't have to dismantle that plutonium producing reactor. that's further down the line. if you are now reducing the pressure, what motivation do they have to make those difficult decisions? >> the motivation they have if you believe the president of the united states and the secretary of state and the other members of the u.n. security council in germany is those sanctions eased right now can be reinstated overnight. arkt -- architecture is in place and they could impose sanctions making life more miserable for the iranians and the new president rowhani doesn't want that. that's the pressure they have over six months. what's wrong with that concept? >> as the president said, we're skeptical as are our arab neighbors. it's crucial to keep pressure up on iran. it's crucial that iranians only get sanctions relief in our opinion if they actually take tangible steps and what they've done is taken cosmetic steps. steps that are not really significant steps that they can rev
and that's what makes america so great. we don't forget those who fought for us. >> certainly, bob dole has not. on another subject, if you would like to hear what bob dole feels about chris christie and even hillary clinton go to cnn.com/stu. >>> this is gps, the global public square, welcome to you in the united states and afternoon the world, i'm fareed zakaria live from new york. we have an important show for you today, failure to reach an agreement on a nuclear deal with iran, despite the praens of the world's top diplomats in geneva this weekend. why were they unable to make a deal? and even if they got one, would it be sellable back home, inn r ir iran, in the united states. this manage, the head of the pakistani taliban was killed last week by an american drone strike, just when the taliban was supposed to sit down to talk peace. was the killing a good negotiating strategy, a serious miscalculation? we will discuss. >>> and the most recent revelations from edward snowden's trove of documents changed the public's perception of the the -- >>> can you change the trajectory of
that's what makes america so great. we don't forget those that fought for us. >> certainly bob dole has not. on another subject, if you would like to hear how bob dole feels about ted cruz, chris christie, hillary clinton, go to our website. thank you for joining us. >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to you around the united states and around the world. we have an important show for you today starting with the failure to reach agreement on a nuclear deal with iran. despite the presence top diplomats in geneva this weekend. why were they unable to make a deal? would it be sellable back home in iran, in the united states, in france? and then an assassination. this man, the head of the pakistani taliban, was killed last week by an american drone strike just when the taliban was supposed to sit down to talk peace. was the killing a good negotiating strategy, we'll discuss. and have the most recent rev revelations from edward snowden. should they? we have two experts give us different views. the prime minister says yes and he did it. finally a tv topic. why one nation spe
aspects of it while a permanent deal is negotiated. in return, iran gets about $30 bill i don't think of sanction relief. it's oil and banking sectors stay fully in place. this is a sensible deal, signed off on by france, britain, germany, russia and china. but this is just an interim deal. and that's why scotch of the opposition to it is misplaced. washington has many points of disagreement with tehran, from its opposition with israel, to its funding of hezbollah, to its funding of iraqi militias. two wary adversaries that are finding some common ground. many countries in the middle east from israel to saudi arabia, have legitimate concerns about iran. but many of these countries have also gotten used to having a permanent enemy, focusing kmes tick attention, garnering support. the middle east is undergoing so much change, perhaps this is one more change. perhaps iran will eventually come in from the cold. for now, though, it's just one step, not a seismic shift. but it is a step forward. for more on this, go to cnn.com/fareed and you can read my commentary for "time" magazine this w
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8

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